About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
SFGTV2 20
SFGTV 10
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
a community center in the western addition and we talk about educating and supporting and one of the things that comes it my mind off the top is really talking to the people that are doing the bullying and understanding hurt people hurt people, right? as we're talking about this, there are two pieces and i'm wondering how do you integrate, we all talk about the finances and making things happen, but one is the mental health piece, the part about understanding where it's coming from, talking about a culture or a community, that's what they are used to. you tell people not to do that but as a child all you've heard is negativity and you've been beat up on and they talk bad to you. it's not just from one workshop you are going to change the mindset, how do we understand the mentality. the other is understanding the online/offline. we had alonzo coming in and speaking to us, they don't understand the impact, it's not enough for me to say we're going to do a workshop or a campaign, a poster thing, it's really about how do we change the culture of a community and a people and it's not just a o
, the culture. they want education, they want a better transit system. they always have ideas to improve the municipal transit system. but when the talk about the bay area, including silicon valley, it is the same thing. transportation symptom -- systems, central subway, high- speed rail. clearly, bart to san jose has been incredibly important to everyone, so that people could travel. i think there is a lot more maturity. there are many successful company that have already turned a corner on making a profit. start-ups have long-term views. they are not looking for instant gratification, as i believe the attitude was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have sig
-- sorry, the june first day in june, june 2. we have reached an agreement with united educators for a two-year agreement. and both years have one-and-a-half of forced closure days. the half closure day is on the last day of school, noted on may 30. and then june 2 is the professional development day which also is a forced closure for our teachers. that's a furlough day. so we are pleased that in the school year is 179.5 days for the 13-14 year. and again those forced closure days may be revisited in the course based on the district and finances. >> okay. it's very timely as i got an e-mail today from someone asking me when the first day of school was in august. thank you for being so timely. >> thank you, madam president, this it will be the district website tomorrow. >> great, assuming we pass it. roll call please. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas,>> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> yes. >> unanimous. >> thank you. next item is -- let's see, informational items. initial proposals. i announce the signing of the following two proposals. 2012
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. thank you. >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city'
what would you invest in?" . i would invest in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring
to continue doing something about it. if anything, our goal is of course to educate our youth; to make sure they understand that they have partners in both city government and in the community to help. those that are lucky and can survive; all of this and when they end up on the shores of san francisco, if we can find them and provide them with support and help them change their lives. and then get to the business of the criminal acts involved in exploiting our kids. we should do all of that and this trafficking. i want to thank everybody for being here today, helping celebrate this event recognizing the awareness month but also recommitting ourselves in every possible way to do what we can do to end this on a worldwide basis and to know the source businesses and individuals and groups of people organized to continue this effort and to do our best to end their activities as well. i want to make sure that i think both emily but also nancy goldberg for your interest as well not only interest but your work as a native san franciscan to do everything that you have been doing to e
floor. that print studio is nationally known for its artwork and its educational programs. for the youth guidance center, i just spoke about the presentation that we did for the ada transition plan. we're requesting $400,000. that is to do all the design and architectural construction drawings and obtain building permits for a $3 million project to be funded in 2014-2015. we are also requesting some funds for miscellaneous general services projects. in our master planning efforts that go on to support all of these projects, that is at the level of $400,000. and let's see, we do have some other funding requests in 2014-15. under the plan, we must plan for a two-year cycle of budget requests. and also a ten-year capital plan request. so we're looking at sun setting our funding in 2015. and it will take us through 2015, almost all the way through that year to complete the construction of all of our projects. these funding requests are separate from curb ramp and sidewalk ada transition plan funding projects. all right? so these are the architectural buildings. and that is the end of my re
of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us
education to their business clients. we had 13 applications for getting assistance to go forward and getting a first walk through and getting an assessment for access abilility. we'll all pleased with this. i'm sure more about come through. and then small business saturday november 30th of 2013 we're going to be starting this earlier with the american express and is chamber to start planning for that. and then the retreat is february 26th is it? or excuse me. . february 25th. and so as i mentioned i will be meeting with president adams to work on the agenda but also will be reaching out to each one of the commissioners to talk to you about the retreat and what you would like to see worked on. legislation wise are having a quiet legislative - not much legislation has been introduced. next meeting you will be hearing is tobacco register restriction. we're going to get a presentation about clove restrictive ice areas. there are several throughout this community and you'll be able to hear with the alcohol restrict areas. and then the c r v the outreach committee will be reviewing the. draft an
at education, you look at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and g
and work with our education institution so that we can better ourselves. we get child care to help us support the jobs that we need to build for our families. and i know as your kids growing up, they're going to understand these things more and more as they take up more responsibilities, right now keeping you from your brand-new bedrooms clean. [laughter] >> helping mom with the dishes, cleaning up to get your education to be the best person you want to be and go for the jobs you always wanted to have. this is the promise we have. it isn't just the physical structure. i know ms. youngblood and i know all of the people that have been invested in this dream know it for sure, that it takes a really whole community to do this. that's why we had such a great development team that came together and worked with us. john stewart, john is right here being led with his development team. we have howard here as well. you have the ridge point, which is i think the most mature of the housing managers here, ridge point's been around since '68, right? >> that's right. >> and all of you amassed togeth
an extensive public outreach in education campaign. was there any discussion how they will reach immigrant communities? >> you'll see in the budget for the customer outreach notification plan is part of the budget. some of that the work will happen by things that davis and associates does. some of it will be pc. it will also having some partnership with community-based organizations who have a much more direct relationship with low income communities, communities of color, non-english speaking community. plus all of the educational materials we have done, will be in multiple languages. one of the things that we will be reaching out to the board over the next couple months is to also get a sense from you in your district, who are the community-based organizations that particularly reach those community that's are hardest to reach so that we're connected with them and we're partnering. make sure that everyone is informed about the benefits and the financial costs associated with clean power s.f. >> i want to thank you for choosing mlb in this process as well. >> thank you very much. thanks m
agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't b
on education and awareness but it's not enough. we need direct services. we need to raise our voices and bush congress and let them know that the united states must recommit to putting resources to ending trafficking. and comprehensive immigration reform. and statewide. we should continue to fight for legislation like the domestic worker to live rights of other things that promote marginalization of our clients. at the end of the day and work with survivors we need to understand and listen and let them know that the work goes on. i want to thank -- a personal mentor. she has really been a mentor; she challenges us and says we are not powerless. what about ...? that is the question we should always ask ourselves. thank you. (applause) >> thank you again to mayor ed lee who has to leave and catch a plane. thank you. (applause) now i would like to call on supervisor carmen chu who has been fantastic and is been really outspoken; she has spoken so often and so well. it is a pleasure to have you here. >> supervisor chu: i want to thank nancy, and the department, and the commission. i want
there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is w
with the municipality department of department of building inspection and also for ongoing outreach education, helping businesses in compliance with their construction-related accessibility improvements. of the dollar, $0.70 is to stay in the local municipality. $0.30 goes to the state. 5% of that $0.70 goes to administering and processing of collecting the dollar and the rest of the 65% comes back to working on inspectors and helping get inspectors become inspectors with the department of building inspection and our outreach education ongoing and helping businesses comply with the construction-related accessibility requirements. so dbi and i have started a conversation just about how we're going to be constructing working with the funds. obviously right now there is not going to be much money. we'll probably see what after may, when the business registration is due from businesses just how much the allotment will be there. and how much annually we'll be able to work with. maximum probably -- it's probably going to be in the $65,000 range per year, with the average of about 80,000 registered busine
housing advocacy, when we were doing education for tenants in public housing, the corette foundation was there. the last 30 years, the corette foundation has been there for the st. anthony's dining hall and in the last year, another $1 million in contributions from the corette foundation to make sure this dining hall go its chance to be rebuilt. [ applause ] >> so st. anthony can increase their space by 42% in the land use and also build the housing. and while we are reminded there is still $2.5 million and i know we're going dig deep in our pockets to help get that done, because it will get done. miracles happen completely, not just partially. that i want to thank and recognize susan, because i know the transition from who we knew to be the face of the corette foundation happened years ago. she has picked it up with the greatest spirit, the greatest honor that can possibly be produced, the spirit of the corette foundation lives today through susan and her con stant donations. she was one of the very first when i was interim mayor and i said i need some of the philanthropic aid and
an investment in public education, but also a long-term investment in public transportation, because as young people from an early age to use the system, the public transportation system, they are going to be committed to public transportation for years to come. >> do you feel additional issues that are facing your district -- that there are additional issues that are facing your district that are unique to your district that you have not mentioned? supervisor campos: there are issues that come up, whether you're talking about the mission, bernal heights, portola. one of the issues we have worked on in bernal heights is the issue of protecting a mural around the public library, which is an issue that raise a lot of other things. it led to a larger discussion in terms of who we are as a community. some people wanted to preserve the mural. others wanted to get rid of the mural. and we believe in a dialogue. so we brought together in mediation everyone so we could come to an understanding of what our common ground was and to see if we could agree on certain basic things, and we were able to come
of years in p developing their own lek lodge -- technological capability, either the educational foundation of it or just any other aspects of oil and gas technology and so forth that they can't produce, come up with on their own reasonably, reasonably inexpensively or at least in comparison to what they have to sort of come up with if they have to deal with the rest of the world, and if particular, of course, whether they'll be forced to look to the u.s. or to the sort of traditional western position for that. >> well, thank you for that question. that is, indeed, the central question. that is the question that needs to be raised next. let me say, first of all, to put things in perspective that when i say that the russian oil industry is not ready, and i'm going to take a few minutes to answer this question, so i hope i won't keep you standing too long, we're talking about extremely clever people. and we're talking about people who are not standing still. so the right way to think of it is moving fronts. the world oil industry has been moving so fast that what we're talking about is a russ
to $1,000. >> and we're just in your neighborhood trying to educate residents about composting and recycling. >> reporter: teams of workers from the city are knocking on doors of residents who, unbeknownst to them, have had their garbage cans inspected by auditors early in the morning. on the evening we followed along, outreach workers were visiting homes which had put items in the wrong bins. >> we've noticed there's been a lot of confusion about what goes in what bin, and so i'm here to answer any questions. >> i think were good with recycling, but i guess could you give me a rundown on what goes in composting? >> if it was once alive-- soiled food-- it is compostable. >> reporter: so far, only warnings have been given out; no fines have been imposed yet. and city officials say the move toward zero waste is catching on. san francisco's 80-year-old private garbage company, which recently invented a new name for itself-- "recology"-- has been investing in recycling and composting facilities, and trying to change san franciscans' perceptions of their garbage. >> where some see g
performance and education. time is 6:xx a south bay teen escapes a kidnapping attempt... her brave fight: caught on tape and street flooding in the north bay after a water main break. the crews rushing to restore water to the neighborhood. we have more 49er fan photos... susie from san jose made her puppy this sweater for last week's game... she's waiting by the door to show the other fans her fabulous new outfit. we want to see more so keep them coming! you can email your photos to news at k-p-i-x dot com, or upload them directly at c-b-s s-f dot com. well, well well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. it's time to make room for the new mattress models but sleep train's huge year
that -- since you're on education, can i slip in he proposed the education cuts while signing the louisiana academic freedom act which lets public schoolteachers discuss creationism in science class? >> caller: oh, amen! oh don't even get me started. >> john: he doesn't want the party to be stupid. >> caller: yes sir. we just had on the ballot, we had like seven or eight amendments and on the the ballot was on there to carry a gun anywhere like at my daughter's pta meeting we got people packing in the back. why do you need a gun in a school? explain that to me. >> john: all of the socialism. there is a lot of socialism in public schools. you gotta be careful. it might catch. >> john: all of the churches this week have on their billboards, there were no guns in school when there was prayer in school. i don't know which schools they've been to but every pta meeting we have a prayer. the kids are not allowed to sing pop songs in their choir. a lot of them are hymns. i'm sorry that i'm yelling. i'm worked up. >> john: can i say every time we have a church say when there was god in school, there
labor, and for lower education levels, and they brought in their -- and seeking more members, they brought in competition for their members. they got away with it and continued to do so. >> so how do you think they respond now to try and stay alive because, you know, now it's a last gaffe type situation. >> well, trmuka is already out on all sorts of nonsense. until the afl-cio has a relationship to the well being of its membership that is direct, that is measurable, quantity, they are going to continue to slide. the only place where there's going to be a slower erosion of union memberships, not power, but union membership, will be in public employees. the local governments, of course, the highest employers of union workers because, primarily the teachers unions, but we're seeing the federal government have to roll back. i mean, it's happening right now. we're going to see a great collision around the postal service which has hundreds of thousands of postal union members, and they are facing a devastating roll back already losing about 200,000 members over the course of the l
turn to two percent of your monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. >> okay, we're just about ready to get started here. if everybody could gather round a little bit. my name is olson lee. i'm the director of the mayor's office of housing. and this is a great day, isn't it? >>
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)